Lauren Montgomery

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What is your name and what is your primary job?
Lauren Montgomery: Director/Producer of DC Direct to DVD movies at Warner Bros Animation

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Animation was my first REAL job. I had one job answering phones for a summer during college that I hated. And before that I did some babysitting during high school, which I also hated. But my first real job was right out of college as a Storyboard artist at Mike Young Productions on He-Man and the Masters of the Universe in 2002.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I’ve had the good fortune of being able to work on a lot of properties I’ve been proud to be a part of.

Those include:

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Frank Forte

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What is your name and your current occupation?
I’m a storyboard artist at Bento Box on Bob’s Burgers.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Ha! I was a Tatto Artist, A line cook at a number of restaurants, and I got paid to watch movie screenings.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
It was really fun to work on Despicable Me 2 doing storyboards. I really got to flex my creativity and have fun. the director let me add gags and take the action in crazy directions just to see what I would come up with. LEGO:Star Wars The Empire Strikes Out (at Threshold Animation) was really great because I got to finally work on a Star wars project AND we got to make fun of it.

How did you become interested in animation?
I grew up on classic Warner Brothers and Tex Avery shorts. They used to show those on TV. Then in college I would Continue…

Lincoln Adams

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Freelance Story Artist and Visiting Professor at the Cleveland Institute of Art

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I’ve never had any really crazy jobs because they’ve all been centered around art in one way or another. But I’ve had art jobs that seemed crazy because I was desperate and needed to feed my family. Spending hours on end doing photo retouch for a down and out wedding photographer only to barely make minimum wage comes to mind…

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Every show I get to work on is one I take pride in being part of. Getting paid to draw pictures and tell stories all day while taking care of my family is a privilege and a blessing! But one of the projects that I feel was the most rewarding wasn’t a client job. It was helping to create a multi-media limited animation for my church a few years ago—A stage size picture book where scrims doubled as snow covered rolling hills and movie screens that had the animatic projected onto them. The story process was much like the Pixar process. We had nothing more than a premise that we formed through improv until it rapidly congealed into a script. And when we coupled that with an original score and live music in between each Act it became a very powerful message. We came together as a group with such wide ranging abilities and developed a meaningful original story that spoke to over 5000 people in one weekend. I was very fortunate to be used by God and to blend so quickly with a handful of creatives in such a short time. Humbling, to be honest…

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I’m from the Northeast Ohio area and I spent the first 12 years of my career working as a freelance illustrator for magazines and because that market was so Continue…

Todd Hampson

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What is your name and your current occupation? 
Todd Hampson, Founder/CAO of Timbuktoons, LLC, a 2D animation and IP/concept development company.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I grilled and/or burnt many steaks at a cafeteria style steakhouse in the 11th grade and delivered food to (and occasionally had food thrown at me by) elderly patients at a hospital during my first year of college. Good times.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Character Design room murals for 3 episodes of Extreme Makeover Home Edition (2 episodes will run the week of Christmas).Visual development and animation production on 9 DVD’s for Phil Vischer’s (Creator of Veggie Tales) latest DVD series “What’s In the Bible?”.  Action Comic Illustrations and Animation for a National Archives traveling exhibit.  Animated commercial spot for Myth Busters.  Production of Addy and Telly Award winning animated commercial series for an automotive company.

How did you become interested in animation?
I’ve always loved film, animation, story, etc. I saw Jungle Book and Pinocchio as a kid and it blew me away. I never realized I could be an animator, but loved character design and film. If anyone has Continue…

Stu Livingston

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What is your name and your current occupation? 
Stu Livingston — I work as a storyboard artist in animation – I also write and draw comics.

 

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I had a lot of customer-service-type jobs before breaking in, but the most unusual was the summer I spent working at Meadows Field Airport, back in Bakersfield, CA where I grew up.  The crew and I were responsible for checking-in passengers, loading and unloading luggage, as well as taxiing in and out the airplanes.  Somehow, I became the guy at the front with the orange batons leading in and out the planes each day.  You have to learn all the signals (turn left, go straight, slow down, stop, engine 1 is on fire…), it’s crazy…there’s definitely nothing like having an airplane in your face once or twice a day haha.  I was also a court sketch-artist for a major murder trial that took place in Bakersfield back in 1994.  They had finally tracked down the key-witness to the crime in 2006, so they scouted out artists at CSUN, where I studied, and I was the one they picked.  Interesting story, actually — I helped land, park and service the very plane that brought that witness to Bakersfield, then a few months later I was drawing his picture in court.  Probably the most ridiculously unlikely coincidence of my whole life – I can barely believe it happened.

 

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
With storyboarding, I’ve had the great pleasure to work on Futurama, a show I’ve loved and watched since its debut.  Due to the large cast and the great variety of stories from script to script, each episode of Futuramacomes with its own unique challenges.  As I’m winding down on an episode, it’s a good feeling to have knowing the next one will most likely be totally different.  With comics, I’ve had the great, great fortune to contribute to the Flight series, which I’ve been a huge fan of since college.  It’s led to some unbelievable opportunities to meet and work with some of my favorite artists!  Most recently, I contributed a story to Explorer: The Mystery Boxes, a new comics anthology from Kazu Kibuishi (who also created Flight).  What made that experience memorable compared to some of the other stories I’ve done was the chance to work with a really hands-on editor who helped challenge, discipline, and guide us until we each came up with stories that we were all really proud of.  Suffice to say I learned a LOT from that experience, I’ll never forget it.

 

How did you become interested in animation?
I made the choice to become an artist very early on – around age 6 or 7 maybe?  It was a shockingly easy choice to make and one I, thankfully, never lost sight of.  Cartoons, animation and drawing were always Continue…

Alex Almaguer

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What is your name? Alex Almaguer. Or Alejandro Almaguer which is my real name that I used to use when I first started in animation. I think you can still find some early episodes of Johnny Bravo or Pinky and the Brain that I storyboarded that have my real name in the credits. And Big Poo. Don’t ask.

What would you say has been your primary job in animation?
Mainly Storyboards. It’s what I started on when I got into the industry and I’ve just stuck to it.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Storyboarding. It doesn’t get crazier than that.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I’d have to say being a part of “The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy.” It was the first time I REALLY got to write and draw my own boards. Within a few months on that show I was already coming up with my own gags and writing my own dialogue and learning how to tell a story. Back then, the studio was still doing the 7 min. format, so we really had a lot of freedom to get in and do a bunch of silly, dumb jokes and get out while telling a simple story at the same time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Di_LO1JqopA Continue…