JOBS: “South Park” Storyboard/Design Artist

South Park” Storyboard/Design Artist

Description

The Comedy Central animated TV series, “South Park,” is looking for a passionate, artistic, and imaginative Storyboard/Design Artist with good drawing, design, and layout skills.  An emphasis on comedy is necessary.  Duties will include Storyboard, Background Design, Character Design, Cinematic Design, and various other mixed animation art design challenges.  Knowledge of computer design programs, i.e. Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, Toon Boom Storyboard Pro, is a must.  Please note:  This is not a compositing job!  Expect an intense, creative, and rewarding production schedule.  Portfolio is essential at the interview. Only candidates living in the Los Angeles area will be considered.  Local interested applicants should apply with a resume, link to reel/portfolio, and story examples ASAP.

Apply HERE

Who Framed Roger Rabbit-The 3 Rules of Living Animation

 

Gizmodo has a great article up a video  done by Youtuber kaptainkristian detailing the reasons Who Framed Roger Rabbit worked so well.

From the site:

Robert Zemeckis has been hit or miss for almost two decades. But in the eighties, he was on fire. Along with Back to the Future, Who Framed Roger Rabbit is just one of those movies that remains great no matter how many years pass and its technical achievements are still a marvel. But why does it work so well?

From a storytelling perspective, Roger Rabbit was funny, unique and had some great performances from people like Bob Hoskins and Christopher Lloyd. But YouTuber, kaptainkristian is more interested in breaking down what sets the film apart from other movies that try to mix live-action with animation.

Check out the entire article here.

Isaac Marzioli

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What is your name and your current occupation? 
My name is Isaac Marzioli and I’m a digital design clean-up artist on Tuff Puppy at Nickelodeon.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I’ve had a few.  Two of the craziest were when I was just shy of 20 and still trying to figure out what I wanted to do as a career.  I answered an ad in the paper (before newspapers went extinct) and ended up in an interview where I agreed to sell knives door to door.  That didn’t last long because the idea of walking into a stranger’s house and pulling out sharp knives sounded sketchy…so I went one worse and started selling perfume in parking lots.  There’s nothing like approaching a random stranger, pulling a bottle out of your bag and asking if you could squirt them with it.  It was this job that taught me that school was very important.  I came home after a long day of chasing weirdos around an ATM parking lot and enrolled into Cal State Fullerton – more specifically, into the illustration program.  And then to get myself through school (and after I graduated, but before I was able to land a job in the industry) I sold ladies’ shoes.  The Al Bundy jokes weren’t the worst of it – I couldn’t believe what people would tell me about their feet.  Or show me.  This one lady had a fuzzy green square on the bottom of her foot that she wanted me to touch.  Then the smells.  There’s nothing like a hot summer day for people to come in and take their shoes off…So I’m really glad to be working in animation.

 

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
It’s been great to be a part of the Butch Hartman cartoons.  It’s a little pandering, but it’s hard to stay employed in the animation business.  Shows don’t last forever, and cancellation usually comes as a surprise.  Being on Fairly Odd Parents, Danny Phantom and now Tuff Puppy – I’ve been employed steadily for the last 10 and a half years.

 

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I’m originally from Northern California – and I came down here to go to school at CSUF.  I hung out with a lot of animation students.  In our junior year they set up a meeting with a storyboard revisionist on Angry Beavers and I Continue…

Tom Riffel

 

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Tom Riffel, and currently I am working freelance, in addition to being a co-founder / content creator of the Toonocracy collective.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation? 
Most of my non-animation experience was either slinging coffee or slinging data. Well, entering data. Neither one super crazy, but I did have one data entry job where I was inputting the personal information of women prisoners into what was supposed to be a prison pen-pal website. Needless to say, some of this information was, ah… Highly inappropriate, despite their surveys specifically saying not to include anything R-rated. Also, at the coffee shop, people liked using the walls as toilet paper. Not really sure how that works.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of? 
I’m very fortunate to say that I have been pretty consistently happy with most of the projects I have been on, but my absolute favorite job was working on The Problem Solverz at Cartoon Network. Cartoon Network is my goal, and being able to work on a series produced entirely in-house and with really great people was a dream come true.  A close second would be the last non-freelance job I had, which was at Hot House Productions, working on a pilot. Like The Problem Solverz, it was all done in-house with a small crew of great people.

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I grew up in South Florida, but didn’t do anything animation-related until I moved to Chicago. Initially I wanted to be a director, so I went to Florida Atlantic University for film studies and ended up with a useless BA in communication. After an aimless year, I went back to school for animation. Post graduation (Part 2), I was able to get a job doing animation for an internet startup company, and then moved on to doing some digital animation and traditional clean up for Calabash Animation. A few years later, I took the plunge and moved to Los Angeles.

What’s a typical day like for you with regards to your job?
Currently, I wake up, make the long trek from the bedroom to my office, and get crackin’ on work in silence. When I’m working at a studio, Continue…

Ryan Kramer

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Ryan Kramer, and I’m a storyboard artist/writer currently at Cartoon Network.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I’ve sold diet pills over the phone, I worked at a car wash, I worked in the costuming dept. at Disneyland, and I worked at movie theatre.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
The current show I’m on, “Uncle Grandpa” is my favorite so far. It’s written and drawn by cartoonists!! Also, I really enjoyed my time storyboarding on Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness.

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
Born in Glendora, CA and currently residing in Glendora, CA. I wanted to work in animation so I spent a lot of time drawing and making my own cartoons. As the coaches on my high school football team would say, Continue…

Jessy Borutski

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Jessy Borutski, director, storyboarder, designer at WB
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation? 
I started working in Animation early. I was 19 right out of college. Prior to that I rented movies in a country convenience store in rural Ontario and worked at Enerlad Links Golf Club. Wasn’t much time to do too many crazy jobs I was busy with highschool.What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of? 
Dragons and Fairies for McDonald’s Europe. All Girl Arcade for Fuel Industries and The Looney Tunes Show for WB. Continue…