WELCOME!

Animation Insider’s goal is to focus on the blue collared worker of animation; the back bone of the industry. We want to focus on the people in the trenches who make the award winning stuff we love.  Basically if your job is or ever was associated in some way with animated movement, we want to interview you! Even if you’re a big famous hotshot you weren’t always and I’m sure you’ve got great stories to tell! We think everybody has stories to tell from the trenches of animation!

If you’ve ever been in the Animation, Feature film or video game industry, please feel free to send us an email and we will send you the questionnaire!

Stu Livingston

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What is your name and your current occupation? 
Stu Livingston — I work as a storyboard artist in animation – I also write and draw comics.

 

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I had a lot of customer-service-type jobs before breaking in, but the most unusual was the summer I spent working at Meadows Field Airport, back in Bakersfield, CA where I grew up.  The crew and I were responsible for checking-in passengers, loading and unloading luggage, as well as taxiing in and out the airplanes.  Somehow, I became the guy at the front with the orange batons leading in and out the planes each day.  You have to learn all the signals (turn left, go straight, slow down, stop, engine 1 is on fire…), it’s crazy…there’s definitely nothing like having an airplane in your face once or twice a day haha.  I was also a court sketch-artist for a major murder trial that took place in Bakersfield back in 1994.  They had finally tracked down the key-witness to the crime in 2006, so they scouted out artists at CSUN, where I studied, and I was the one they picked.  Interesting story, actually — I helped land, park and service the very plane that brought that witness to Bakersfield, then a few months later I was drawing his picture in court.  Probably the most ridiculously unlikely coincidence of my whole life – I can barely believe it happened.

 

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
With storyboarding, I’ve had the great pleasure to work on Futurama, a show I’ve loved and watched since its debut.  Due to the large cast and the great variety of stories from script to script, each episode of Futuramacomes with its own unique challenges.  As I’m winding down on an episode, it’s a good feeling to have knowing the next one will most likely be totally different.  With comics, I’ve had the great, great fortune to contribute to the Flight series, which I’ve been a huge fan of since college.  It’s led to some unbelievable opportunities to meet and work with some of my favorite artists!  Most recently, I contributed a story to Explorer: The Mystery Boxes, a new comics anthology from Kazu Kibuishi (who also created Flight).  What made that experience memorable compared to some of the other stories I’ve done was the chance to work with a really hands-on editor who helped challenge, discipline, and guide us until we each came up with stories that we were all really proud of.  Suffice to say I learned a LOT from that experience, I’ll never forget it.

 

How did you become interested in animation?
I made the choice to become an artist very early on – around age 6 or 7 maybe?  It was a shockingly easy choice to make and one I, thankfully, never lost sight of.  Cartoons, animation and drawing were always Continue reading

Micah McNeely

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Micah McNeely and I am a freelance 3D modeler and Texture Artist.
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Before Animation I was a Production Supervisor at Kinko’s Copies and the Chappell Episode “Pop Copy”was a day in the life of my job LOL! My experience there gave me the interest in computers and design so, it wasn’t too bad of an experience 

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Oh Man one of the coolest things for me to work on were game cinematics. I worked on cinematic trailers for Colonization/Civilization Revolution and a yet announced game. That being said, I am now working on environments for the PC title FORGE and that has been a great experience for me because although most of my experience in the VFX studio category I have always wanted to work on a video game.
How did you become interested in animation?
Ever since I was a kid I loved comics and games! I grew up in the Marvel Comics and NINETENDO era and when my mother put my first console on layaway at our local Kmart I was hooked! I would say that I also had Continue reading

Allan Neuwirth

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Allan Neuwirth.  Right now I’m writing and producing several different projects for film and TV… both animated and live action.

 

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?

Wow. I got into the animation biz at the age of 23, so didn’t have too many jobs beforehand…  but one of them was designing and re-scaling newspaper print ads for United Artists feature films, in a crazy bullpen art company called Carluth Studios.  One wall of their 3rd story office was a huge window from floor to ceiling, overlooking Times Square — an amazing view of all the hubbub — and I was the youngest artist working there (everyone else was well into their fifties and sixties and beyond).  Before that I was a salesman at the store Hammacher Schlemmer, selling very expensive toys and gadgets to the very wealthy and very famous.  Also an insane job.  And as a teen I worked as an usher in movie theaters, where I would memorize literally every line of dialogue from every film…. from the opening frame to the closing credits.  To this day I can recite some of them.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Quite a few, actually.  Early on I designed and directed lots of animated motion graphics and flying logos for ABC News and Sports, HBO, NBC, and other networks.  Worked on the original show openings for “ABC Nightline,” “This Week with David Brinkley,” “20/20,” the “World Series,” and many more.  Got to design the scoreboard animation for the New York Yankees (for their DiamondVision screen, so I created them on film), working for George Steinbrenner for two seasons, during the height of his bombastic, bullying days.  (He was pretty nice to me, actually, but I watched him berate people like mad in the front offices!)  Was co-developer and animation head writer of Cartoon Network’s first pre-school series, “Big Bag,” with Jim Henson Productions and Sesame Workshop.  The network gave us an awful time slot, so the series only lasted a few years… but we broke some new ground and it came out great.  Animated and directed a bunch of award-winning TV commercials, all character animation.  Lots of fun!  Many other projects that I’m proud to have been a part of over the years, but a few that come to mind right now are “Arthur,” “Courage the Cowardly Dog,” “The Octonauts,” and two recent Hallmark Christmas specials that I’ve written, “Jingle All the Way” and “Jingle & Bell.”  Also an amazing new feature film that I’m producing right now, called “Drawing Home.”  I’ve also written some books I’m quite proud of, including “Makin’ Toons” (all about the toon boom of the 1990s and 2000s), and co-created a widely syndicated comic strip called “Chelsea Boys” that ran for nearly nine years.  Now that I think about it, it would take me a long time to list ALL the projects I’m proud to have worked on…
How did you become interested in animation?
I’ve always been a rabid animation fan, from when I first started watching “The Rocky & Bullwinkle Show,” “Beany and Cecil” and Warner Bros. cartoons on TV while I was Continue reading