WELCOME!

Animation Insider’s goal is to focus on the blue collared worker of animation; the back bone of the industry. We want to focus on the people in the trenches who make the award winning stuff we love.  Basically if your job is or ever was associated in some way with animated movement, we want to interview you! Even if you’re a big famous hotshot you weren’t always and I’m sure you’ve got great stories to tell! We think everybody has stories to tell from the trenches of animation!

If you’ve ever been in the Animation, Feature film or video game industry, please feel free to send us an email and we will send you the questionnaire!

NOTE: Can’t find the interview you came for? Just do a quick search in the box on the top right column and it will come up. Also if you’re wanting to link to your own interview do a search for it first and THEN use that search link instead of just going to your interview’s link because since we rotate interviews around the link will change but you can always do a search and find that link never changes.

Francis Glebas

What is your name and your current occupation?
I’m Francis Glebas and I am a storyboard artist and author. I’ve also been a director, vis dev artist and teacher.
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Newspaper delivery. It got crazy with the dogs. I taught cut-out animation at a summer camp. I built models for a model building company, like architectural models and airplanes. It gets old when you’re on your 100th airplane. I also designed and painted
stage sets. I’ve probably painted more square footage than most background artists. After getting into the business I once ran a brainstorming session at Los Alamos Laboratories that was surreal.
What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Aladdin was a magical time, the studio was buzzing with excitement but we were still under the radar of the money people. I remember seeing the Whole New World that I storyboarded with crude drawings at the premiere and every department took it and
made it better. It was incredible. I also poured my heart into the ending of Pocahontas. Lion King and Ice Age 4 were also really great to work on. Space Chimps was really fun too. Sometimes it’s more about the people you work with. In pre-Pixar days, getting Ed Catmull’s TWEEN system to work at NYIT was exciting. It created automatic inbetweens and we used it on hundreds of commercials. Well, maybe we reached 100.
How did you become interested in animation?
To work out traumas from watching Continue…

Robb Pratt

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What is your name and your current occupation?
I’m Robb Pratt, story artist.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
For years I made stained glass windows in a little mom and pop shop in Studio City. There were actually some cool moments on that job. I got to meet Julian Lennon when I was installing some windows in his house! I’m a HUGE Beatles fan, so that was something that I’ll never forget! I also got to work for Erik Estrada, and Steven Adler, the drummer for Guns N Roses and future reality show star! What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of? I was very fortunate to be an animator for Walt Disney Feature Animation on every traditionally animated film AFTER “The Lion King”! I got to work directly with Bruce Smith, animating Kerchak in “Tarzan”, and John Pomeroy, animating to Michael J. Fox’s voice for “Atlantis”. After traditional animation faded out out Disney, I was able to work for Eric Goldberg on “Looney Tunes: Back In Action”. I actually got to animate Bugs Bunny saying his iconic “What’s up, doc?” line!

How did you become interested in animation?
Funny… speaking of Bugs Bunny, it was the Warner Bros. shorts that made me want to be an animator! I love the artform of shorts: get in, get a few laughs, then get out before you’ve warn out your welcome! I also was WAY into the Fliescher Popeye shorts. I just recently rediscovered them with Continue…

Carl Beu

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Carl Beu, and I’m a background painter on Motorcity!
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I drew portraits at events and theme parks for a few years. You never knew who you were gonna draw, or what their expectations were. I drew everyone from biker gangs & 90 year-old grannies to Punk rockers and screaming babies.
What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I’ve been fortunate enough to have worked with an absolutely amazing crew on every animation project I’ve been on so far, but Motorcity in particular has been pushing the bar very high. It’s exciting to be on such an ambitious show!

How did you become interested in animation?
When I was in high school, I attended the CSSSA summer program for animation at Cal arts. That experience, and the Continue…

Nick Fredin

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Nick Fredin. Currently working as an animator at Weta Digital.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
The craziest jobs I had were actually in between animation jobs when I was just trying to get my foot in the door in the animation industry. I worked for a movie theatre cleaning up popcorn kids puke, but mainly I switched off my radio so no one could find me and watched the films that I would one day help make. I fully recommend to newbies to get a job related to your craft whether it’s working at a video rental store or an art gallery. I would also suggest learning to cook or make coffees. Once you’ve broken into the industry you’ll have a full wealth of movie knowledge, know how to feed yourself and stay caffeinated.

 

What are some of your favourite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Rango won the Oscar for best animated feature this year so I’d have to say I’m most proud of that project. Not only was it amazing to work on but the team was incredible as well. It was also amazing to be a part of The Adventures of Tin Tin under the direction of Steven Spielberg. I felt like a little kid when I was a part of my first telephone conference with Steven Spielberg. Any time he approved a shot it was spine tingling. Rise of the Planet of the Apes was pretty special too although I didn’t get to work on it nearly as much as many others. 2010-2011 was a pretty great year for me in terms of working on some great projects.

How did you become interested in animation?
Jurassic Park! After seeing that film I needed to somehow be involved in the movie making process. I wasn’t sure exactly how though. After a suspicious Continue…

Peter Nagy

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Peter, Peter Nagy. I’m a lucky animator, who is a two-time winner of The 11 Second Club and I edit an animation collection-site, the Living Lines Library. I’m currently working as lead animator at Gyár Post Production, in the field of commercials.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
After I got out of secondary school I had only one job before I found animation. I worked as an excavation graphic for a longer period. As a strong, young man, my work included several things, from precisely drawing the findings to more serious physical work, such as ditching. At such times we threw the soil together with the other manual workers, which I didn’t mind at all, because at least my muscles were kept in good condition.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
As I glance over the films I have worked in, I like the arch of my career entirely. I like that I started learning it from the very basics. I have always been proud that I started as an inbetweener in Corto Maltese: La cour secrète des Arcanes. I’m glad that I had an opportunity to work with the team of Digic Pictures at the time of Assasin’s Creed Revelations. Although that job was far from the character animation that is dear to me, they were the most professional team I have ever worked with, led by my favourite Hungarian director, István ‘Putyi’ Zorkóczy.

How did you become interested in animation?
I have been drawing ever since my childhood, but those were only still pictures, except for the stick figures moving at the corner of my exercise book. I’ve always been fascinated by Continue…