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Animation Insider’s goal is to focus on the blue collared worker of animation; the back bone of the industry. We want to focus on the people in the trenches who make the award winning stuff we love.  Basically if your job is or ever was associated in some way with animated movement, we want to interview you! Even if you’re a big famous hotshot you weren’t always and I’m sure you’ve got great stories to tell! We think everybody has stories to tell from the trenches of animation!

If you’ve ever been in the Animation, Feature film or video game industry, please feel free to send us an email and we will send you the questionnaire!

Gerry Mooney

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My current name is Gerry Mooney, and my occupation is Director of Motion Graphics for a litigation graphics firm in Westchester, New York.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I designed slot machines for a tiny outfit in Charlotte, NC, for a year. It was moderately interesting, in that there is some amazingly sophisticated graphic and animation work being done for slots and their related displays these days, but the downside is that the gambling industry is not that interesting. So it was fun to do the work, but what you were selling was not very challenging.
In between my magazine illustrating days and animation, I did web design for a few years. One temp job I got was with a pretty major NY ad agency where the entire web staff had walked out the day before, so they were desperate for freelancers to jump in and take up the slack. I worked there for a month and the odd thing was that since everyone had walked out, I never knew for that whole month who exactly I was supposed to report to. I handed in my work to a guy across the hall, but he wasn’t my superior or manager, he was just a guy who was still there.  I’ve always managed to make my living as an artist though. I worked in a framing shop after college, assisted Joe Simon in his home studio back years ago, and did layout and pasteup for a physics journal, “The Physical Review” at Brookhaven National Laboratory.  I spent most of my professional career as a magazine illustrator for pubs like Forbes, Parents, The New Republic, Cruising World, Medical Economics, The NY Daily News, a Consumer Reports magazine for kids called Zillions, and American Express, clients like that. One of my favorites was doing a regular humor feature for Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, called “Mooney’s Modules”. That ran for three years and was the first place the Gravity Poster was seen by a large audience.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Certainly that Asimov’s gig would be at the top of the list. I would submit a bunch of sketches, and I’d be surprised at some of the ideas they signed off on. I wondered sometimes if they actually got the jokes or if they just didn’t want to appear that they didn’t.
I completed an animated music video last year where I was given complete creative control. It was for Shawn Letts, an American musician who lives and works in Singapore. It was a dream job! I was just told, “Call us when it’s done”. I really felt free to explore imagery and effects that I could just play around with, without having to “sell” a client on the concepts. And then of course there’s my graphic novel, “Sister Mary Dracula”, which is currently being shopped around to publishers. It originated as a Flash animation that I did in 2001 and put online. It got accepted as an entry in the San Diego Comicon’s Independent Film Festival in 2004, which motivated me to expand it into a graphic novel that took me four years to complete.  These are all one-man projects, not strictly speaking things that I was “a part of”; I WAS the projects!

How did you become interested in animation?
I’ve always been interested in animation and dabbled as a kid with both clay and cel animation, but Continue reading

Kevin Long

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Kevin Long and I am currently working as a Layout Supervisor at Atomic Cartoons in Vancouver, BC, Canada.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I don’t know if they’d be considered “crazy”, but I’ve worked in lumber mills, delivered pizza, pumped gas, taught guitar and was once employed for a short time at Virgin Records.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Well, the show I’m currently working on is pretty awesome and special, but some of my fave projects have been animating on “The Buzz On Maggie” for Warner Brothers and supervising key animation for two seasons of “Kid vs. Kat” at DHX Media (formerly Studio B Productions), but my most favorite experience is also my very first job – Working in the art department for the Tom Green movie “Freddy Got Fingered”. When you’re on a movie set watching Tom Green whip around a rubber newborn baby, everything else kinda pales in comparison.

 

How did you become interested in animation?
After two years of Design school, I couldn’t find any work, so I started Continue reading

Terry Daniels

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What is your name and your current occupation?
I’m Terry and I’m currently a freelance for hire animation/motion graphics artist

 

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I was a music store clerk for about 4 years cumulative, pizza guy, paraprofessional, and also a waitstaffer at public and private events where I once saw the taxidermied head of a black man at a game hunter’s estate.  It was next to a basketball encased in glass.  Oh yeah, also worked at Radio Shack!

 

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Haven’t had to many gigs, but in terms of projects I liked doing Cybetales-Cafe 4 for the Playboy animation contest.  It didn’t win but I leaned a lot about animation pipelines hands on.  The only thing I didn’t do on that was the music which was created by my friend Polyphonic.  I also worked on a mech based fighting game in Unity.  I actually like programming and will do more with that hopefully as I have been designing and testing more mecha.  I’m also doing a lot more architectural stuff these days.

How did you become interested in animation?
The main reason was Saturday morning cartoons as a kid. I think that got me started drawing.  Oh, and Continue reading