Temris Ridge

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Temris Ridge, independent animator.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Not many. I went from high school to university to animation school with a little burger flipping and file sorting in between.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
One of my earliest, coolest projects was working on Sam Niemann’s project called “Ruby Rocket.” One of my favorite commercial jobs of my career has to be animating Pop Tarts commercials for TV, which includes GPS, Stuck, and Tour Bus. I was also very excited to get to do some animation for the end credits for the Laika feature film, The Boxtrolls.

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I’m from Washington State, born and raised Pacific Northwesterner. I studied art, film, and writing in college and then Continue…

Tom Riffel

 

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Tom Riffel, and currently I am working freelance, in addition to being a co-founder / content creator of the Toonocracy collective.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation? 
Most of my non-animation experience was either slinging coffee or slinging data. Well, entering data. Neither one super crazy, but I did have one data entry job where I was inputting the personal information of women prisoners into what was supposed to be a prison pen-pal website. Needless to say, some of this information was, ah… Highly inappropriate, despite their surveys specifically saying not to include anything R-rated. Also, at the coffee shop, people liked using the walls as toilet paper. Not really sure how that works.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of? 
I’m very fortunate to say that I have been pretty consistently happy with most of the projects I have been on, but my absolute favorite job was working on The Problem Solverz at Cartoon Network. Cartoon Network is my goal, and being able to work on a series produced entirely in-house and with really great people was a dream come true.  A close second would be the last non-freelance job I had, which was at Hot House Productions, working on a pilot. Like The Problem Solverz, it was all done in-house with a small crew of great people.

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I grew up in South Florida, but didn’t do anything animation-related until I moved to Chicago. Initially I wanted to be a director, so I went to Florida Atlantic University for film studies and ended up with a useless BA in communication. After an aimless year, I went back to school for animation. Post graduation (Part 2), I was able to get a job doing animation for an internet startup company, and then moved on to doing some digital animation and traditional clean up for Calabash Animation. A few years later, I took the plunge and moved to Los Angeles.

What’s a typical day like for you with regards to your job?
Currently, I wake up, make the long trek from the bedroom to my office, and get crackin’ on work in silence. When I’m working at a studio, Continue…

Ken Turner


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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Ken Turner and I’m a filmmaker/illustrator.

 

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Can’t say anything prior was at all that crazy.

 

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I think any of the films/books I’ve personally been able to make during school and after graduating and that I’ve put my own stamp on were always the projects I’m most proud of. I found personal film projects to be the most rewarding as I can hire all my talented friends and collaborate to make something that would otherwise not exist.

 

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I’m from Mississauga, Ontario and currently residing in Toronto, Ontario. I’ve been drawing as long as I can remember and was Continue…

Stephen Brooks

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FII2N-t–0g

What is your name and your current occupation? 
Stephen Brooks, freelance animator.
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation? 
Worked at a Saw Mill in Alaska, Vacuum Cleaner salesman in Florida, and Ski Instructor in New York.
What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of? 
Moshi Monsters, I did all the character animation for Furi & Luvli. It was great to be apart of the beginning of the game and see it explode the way it has. I also did a teaser spot for Nate Quarry’s comic Zombie Cagefighter where I got to choreograph a fight AND animate a zombie attack simultaneously… which is just special.

How did you become interested in animation? 
On a trip to Disney World (or Land… one of them) I saw a demo of Continue…

Bob Etchingham

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Bob Etchingham, I’m a key poser/lead animator at Magpie6Media in Dublin, Ireland.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
My uncle owns a jewellers and workshop here in Dublin. So I started an apprenticeship at the age of twelve while I was still at school and during college and worked there pretty much up until I got into cartoons. I miss it sometimes. Lots of interesting characters working in that industry.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I worked on a show at Studio B in Vancouver (Now DHX media) called Kid vs. Kat. That was a great show to work on cause it was the first gig I did at a studio that actually owned the show. So If you had any suggestions about a scene, something that might make it better or funnier you could just walk into the next room and talk to the director about it. The more creative input you have into something you’re working on the better it comes out and the happier you are as an animator. Also the Slacker Cats title sequences that I worked on for Seth Kearsley was a great gig cause he was really easy going with how I went about them. Again more freedom means a better end product and a better experience over all. After that then I guess just my own shorts that I make all the time. I did some animation for the podcast Tell ’em Steve Dave on the smodcast network (unsolicited haha) They came out well and got a good response so thats cool. All my own stuff is on the Bobetch Productions Youtube page.

How did you become interested in animation?
I just always drew for as long as I can remember. As a kid I was really into Looney Tunes, then Ren and Stimpy all the usuals. Cartoons were just always there in the background. I used to sit and try and Continue…

David de Rooij

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What is your name and your current occupation? 
My name is David de Rooij and I am a freelance Animator/Storyboard Artist/Character Designer.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation? 
While I was doing Art School, I had a couple of little jobs like working at a supermarket, a zoo, a club. I also made a little comic for a division of a big Energy Company.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of? 
I haven’t been part of many big animation projects yet, but during my internship at Anikey Studios I got to work on a couple of very nice short animated films: “Paul and the Dragon”and “Little Quenton”!

How did you become interested in animation? 
I have always watched cartoons and even made my own comics and flipbooks. I tried to animate digitally in GIF Animator and Flash, drawing with my mouse! I just never realized that I could become a professional animator. After finishing high school I studied Graphic Design at two different Art Schools, because I Continue…