Freezing a Muay Thai battle in time: Saddington Baynes premieres unique ‘Statue’ full-body 3D simulations

Freezing a Muay Thai battle in time: Saddington Baynes premieres unique ‘Statue’ full-body 3D simulations

You can view the entire piece here.

LONDON, UK – 12th May 2017 – With the release of its Statue project, London-based creative studio Saddington Baynes has created a frozen moment of a Muay Thai battle, utilising full-body 3D photo scans created in partnership with body-scanning experts FBFX.

Saddington Baynes is well-known for pushing the boundaries of technical innovation in the creative industry, establishing its R&D arm SBLabs to showcase this in-house ability. For Statue, SBLabs used advanced procedural displacement techniques, complex shaders and dynamic particle simulations to deliver a fierce fighting showcase. The results are already sweeping up accolades across the creative community, including a Platinum in the Creativity International Media & Interactive Design Awards.

James Digby-Jones, Executive Creative Director at Saddington Baynes, comments: “We wanted to create a project to showcase our expertise working with complex simulations and highly detailed 3D talent, while also demonstrating our imaginative storycraft and VFX capabilities. The Statue project quickly picked up a Platinum award and we’ve entered it into others. It’s a great piece that shows off a variety of high level skills, applicable to multiple market sectors.”

Scanning and capture

To achieve unparalleled detail required meticulous planning. SBLabs blocked out early concepts in Cinema 4D to explore strong poses and the choreography and to direct the camera path.

SBLabs then approached SFX costume and 3D scanning specialists FBFX, who captured key moments of the Muay Thai battle in live action, as one at a time the combatants jumped and punched and kicked, all the while being captured as high resolution point clouds and image maps from multiple cameras. Besides being martial arts enthusiasts, both models were actually part of the Saddington Baynes team – a Production Assistant and a CG artist!

Andrew White, Creative Director at Saddington Baynes, comments: “FBFX helped us build separate scan captures in ZBrush with seamless results. They were a huge asset, delivering exactly what we needed in line with our vision”

Particle simulation

Alongside these scanned models, Statue also features complex Houdini simulations. The models land blows on each other, cracking open igneous husks to reveal the searing heat below. SBLabs ran a series of customised fragmentation and tessellation processes on the geometry with look development performed in Mantra.

Andrew White, Creative Director at Saddington Baynes, comments: “We found that by outputting some custom aov passes we could create a hot metal look inside Nuke. By using holdout mattes and base beauty elements, this gave us a great way to time and control the intensity of the heat effect.”

Based out of London, Saddington Baynes has a long history of technical innovation. Besides being the original pioneers of digital retouching in 1991, Saddington Baynes were also one of the first production studios to harness the potential of CGI in-house. More recently, the team developed an Engagement Insights® service – the world-first use of neuroscience techniques to measure emotional impact of imagery. Recent commissions include Honda’s pan-European ‘Real View Test Drive’ campaign.

About Saddington Baynes

Saddington Baynes is a leading creative production agency that has produced premium imagery for advertising agencies and brand clients for 25 years.

Saddington Baynes’ mission is to create sensational imagery that inspires brand devotion, with a focus on emotional reactions and engagement. To achieve this, Saddington Baynes developed its Engagement Insights® service – an entirely new way to measure the emotional impact of imagery, using neuroscience techniques.

http://www.saddingtonbaynes.com/work/favourites/statue

ROYAL TELEVISION SOCIETY OPENS ENTRIES FOR CRAFT & DESIGN AWARDS 2017

PRESS RELEASE

ROYAL TELEVISION SOCIETY OPENS ENTRIES FOR

CRAFT & DESIGN AWARDS 2017

 

London, 05 June 2017 – The Royal Television Society (RTS), Britain’s leading forum for television and related media, has launched the RTS Craft & Design Awards 2017. The Awards celebrate excellence in broadcast television and aim to recognise the huge variety of skills and processes involved in programme production.

 

Awards are presented in 11 categories including: Design, Make Up Design, Costume Design, Production Design, Effects, Directors, Photography, Lighting and Multicamera, Sound, Editing and Music.In addition, there are three awards given at the discretion of the Judges: Design & Craft Innovation, Judges’ and Lifetime Achievement Awards. Entries are not accepted for these categories but the RTS welcomes suggestions.

 

This year will see Lee Connolly, Creative Director at ITV Studios, take over as Chair of the awards from former Chair, Cheryl Taylor. He says, “The RTS Craft & Design Awards are an excellent way of recognising the extraordinary breadth of talent and depth of expertise we have throughout the creative content industry and I am delighted to be the new Chair.”

 

All entries must be submitted using the RTS Online Awards Entry System https://awardsentry.rts.org.uk/entrant/index.php by Friday, 1 September 2017. All entries must have been first transmitted between 1 September 2016 and 31 August 2017 and may be submitted by companies or individuals. The Awards will be presented on Monday 27 November 2017 at the London Hilton on Park Lane. For more information visit: https://www.rts.org.uk/awards/craft-design-awards.

 

THE AWARD CATEGORIES:

Design – recognises achievement in three categories: trails and packaging, programme content sequences and titles.
Make Up Design – recognises achievement in all areas of makeup, including hair styling and wigs, in two categories: drama and entertainment and non-drama productions.
Costume Design – recognises achievement in two categories: drama and entertainment and non–drama productions.
Production Design – recognises achievement in two categories: drama and entertainment and non–drama productions.
Effects – recognises achievement from any area of programme making in three categories: digital effects, special effects and picture enhancement.
Director – recognises achievement in three categories: comedy drama/situation comedy, drama and documentary/factual and non-drama productions.
Photography – recognises achievement in location based single camera work in two categories: drama and comedy, and documentary/factual and non-drama productions.
Lighting and Multicamera – recognises achievement in three categories: lighting for multicamera, multicamera work and multicamera work – sport. The Multicamera awards are designed to recognise those who work in studio based or OB multicamera programming across all genres.
Sound – recognises achievement in two categories: drama and entertainment and non-drama productions. These Awards recognise the whole sound team and both recording supervisor and mixing supervisor should be named on the entry form.
Editing – recognises achievement in four categories: drama, documentary/factual, entertainment and comedy and sport.
Music – recognises achievement in two categories: original title music and original score. The titles or score must be specially commissioned for a specific programme.

Kids Entertainment Professionals For Young Refugees Fundraiser

Animators and actors, writers and composers, game designers and YA authors, producers, board artists, agents, studio and network executives – the entire international children’s entertainment community is coming together June 18-24 in an unprecedented grassroots fundraiser via Crowdrise. Help spread the word! PLEASE SHARE THIS VIDEO with friends and colleagues and SIGN UP FOR THE FUNDRAISER NOW at: https://www.facebook.com/events/114556855770817/
More information at our home page: https://www.facebook.com/kepyr/
Thank you – and Keep the Love Coming!

June Flix: Animation Nights New York program for Wed, June 14th, 2017

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Contact: Yvonne Grzenkowicz – info@animationnights.com, (347) 788-0243

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June Flix: Animation Nights New York program for Wed, June 14th, 2017

Animation Nights New York (ANNY) is a monthly animation event held in the South Street Seaport District of New York City. Our program consists of select animated short films and virtual reality animation experiences from all around the world.

Approx. run time is 80 minutes. Admission to this event is free. Refreshments are available for purchase at the venue.

Animated Short Film Program:

  • The Cold Heart. Hannes Rall. Germany, 2013. 29:00.
  • Nightlights. Katarzyna Pieróg. Poland, 2016. 2:20.
  • The Right Way. Emilio Yebra. Spain, 2015. 4:10.
  • Two Wishes. Nadav Tal. Israel, 2016. 1:00.
  • Waking Sleeping Bat. Oleksandr (Sashko) Danylenko. United States, 2015. 0:24.
  • The One Who Tamed Clouds. Nicolas Bianco-Levrin. France, 2015. 4:30.
  • You Are Not the Strongest. Emilio Yebra. Spain, 2016. 1:00.
  • The Shawy’s Fruiks Circus. Shawy. France, 2014. 0:15.
  • The Cuckoo. Mikhail Gorobchuk. Russian Federation, 2013. 12:15.
  • STADIUM N3. Renata Motyka. Poland, 2016. 2:45.
  • Dang it to Heck!. Rob Hunter, Chris Edser. Australia, 2016. 4:00.
  • LEMONS. Bonnie Mier. Netherlands, 2016. 1:57.
  • PNxKNF. Keith Kavanagh. Ireland, 2016. 2:52.
  • The Indigestion. Mathilde Remy. Belgium, 2016. 6:12.
  • The Beard. Sofya Badalova. Russian Federation, 2015. 7:03.

Virtual Reality (VR) Animation Experiences:

  • DO NOT Push the Red Button!. Peter Spence. Norway, 2016.
  • Virtual ANNY Demo. Animation Nights New York, High Fidelity, Artella. United States, 2017.

Event Details: Wed, June 14th 2017, 8pm — 180 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038

 

Getting to ANNY: Take the 4, 5, 6, A, C, 2, 3, J, or Z train to Fulton Street. Street parking is available.

 

RSVP: Eventbrite, Facebook, and Meetup

The Sword and the cineSync: VFX of King Arthur

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The Sword and the cineSync: VFX of King Arthur

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword feels like the logical next step in Guy Ritchie’s career – after all, who better to direct a modern reimagining of King Arthur than British film royalty? Ritchie has spent years moulding rough and rugged England into whip-smart stories of sleazy charm, and Ancient Albion feels like home turf.

Ritchie has driven a bolt of trademark energy through King Arthur’s folklore, the murky grasslands and staunch stone castles fizzling with the director’s verve. This is mythological Britain filtered through modern-day cinematic technique – not to mention some truly exceptional VFX, delivered under the watchful eye of VFX Production Supervisor Gavin Round (sadly not of the round table).

Boasting a decade of experience in visual effects, Round has worked on numerous blockbusters, chalking up visual feasts such as Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and Edge of Tomorrow. He teamed with Ritchie on King Arthur to breathe new life into the classic tale of swords, sovereigns and sorcery, corralling the project’s global VFX teams around a singular vision with support from cineSync.

“I came onto King Arthur in 2014, working with VFX Producer Alex Bicknell and VFX Supervisor Nick Davis, who I’d worked with on Edge of Tomorrow,” he explains. “Thanks to that experience, we had an established, effective workflow in place for meeting with vendors, viewing material, and of course, using cineSync. In other words, we could hit the ground running on King Arthur.”

Vendors of the round table

cineSync was key to making King Arthur’s VFX a reality, given the nine separate vendors involved in the process. Framestore stood as the lead vendor, operating out of both its London and Montreal studios. Contributions also came in from MPC’s Montreal team, Method Studios in LA and Vancouver, Scanline in Vancouver, and many more, totaling nine different studios.

Round was in the thick of the battle on King Arthur from pre to post, helping to establish Ritchie’s new kingdom of myth and magic across all studios involved.

“My duties involved managing vendors, making sure the shots came in on time and that the vendors had everything they need,” recalls Round. “cineSync enabled us to review the material constantly, so we were always aware of the status of any given shot. We could see it in real-time to discuss with the vendors.”

cineSync played a large role in creation of King Arthur’s many mythical creatures, such as a nine-foot CG villain, whose creation was split between VFX vendors Framestore and MPC.

“It was a delicate process, as we had to maintain continuity between the two vendors, who were essentially building different parts of the same being,” explains Round. “We needed to constantly review and check the material back-to-back to ensure everything transitioned correctly, no matter which vendor it came from. This is the exact kind of situation where cineSync is so useful – it saves a lot on travel!”

cineSync was used almost every day in post on King Arthur, particularly towards the end of the project. “We relied on cineSync heavily during the backend of the post schedule, at which point we were ramping up and getting most of our shots through,” says Round. “We used cineSync with all the vendors involved – we knew we could rely on it.”

The sword and the cineSync

cineSync proved to be a powerful tool throughout the filmmaking process – and one that, unlike Excalibur, anyone could wield: the entire King Arthur production team fell in love with the simplicity of cineSync – in particular, VFX Supervisor Nick Davis, who would make sure every VFX shot was reviewed, analyzed, and improved by all vendors.

“He likes to do cineSync sessions because he can pull up a shot, make marks on it, draw on it and tell the artists exactly where he wants a creature to walk,” says Round. “We did it for the big shots and small shots alike – whatever we were working on, cineSync ensured that the sequence ended up looking much better on screen.”

For Round, King Arthur revolved around the power of cineSync, ensuring that every shot was delivered to the ultimate satisfaction of all involved: “cineSync was completely intertwined in our day-to-day workflow. It was a brilliant overall tool and made my life much simpler.”

Or, as the British would put it: Bob’s your uncle!

In Sequence Kickstarter

In Sequence is a new animated film from Brooklyn based artist George de Moura. The animation is executed in a fairly wonky style reminiscent of artists such as Mike Judge, Priit Parn, and Igor Kovalyov but at times utilizes a form of rotoscoping to increase the realism of the character movements and pacing. The film is part way through a crowdfunding campaign to help cover the expenses to complete the film. Professional actors will be used in the creation of the footage and audio that will be used as the foundation of the project. I hope that you can help make this project come to life by contributing or sharing through your networks.

Kickstarter – http://kck.st/2qv0QHE

Website – http://georgedemoura.com