Daryl-Rhys Taylor

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


What is your name and your current occupation?
 Daryl-Rhys Taylor :and I am an animation graduate freelancing from home.
 What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I worked in a gallery called ‘The Animation Art Gallery’ (now Art You Grew Up With) and they had a stock room full of Mickey Mousde merchandise received from the manager of Blue. I had to catalogue all of it and sell it on Ebay.
 What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
 I enjoyed working on my student film. We were the only ones to ever do a 2D film in our college. I really enjoyed my week at Brown Bag Films being a storyboard conformer on the upcoming Disney Junior show “Doc Mc.Stuffins” and any time I’ve visited Phil Vallentin at Espresso  Animation. Also I’m proud of “The Booger Monster” children’s book I’m illustrating right now for the Koncept Factory.
How did you become interested in animation?
I have always known I wanted to be an animator. All I ever did when I was little was watch cartoons and draw. I loved the Looney Tunes and the Disney Classics. I read all the books when I was growing up. One of my happiest memories was when

Continue…

Aliki Theofilopoulos Grafft

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What is your name and current occupation?
Aliki Theofilopoulos Grafft

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Well I suppose I will go in order and explain why…The first would be my first job in animation…the movie “Hercules” at Walt Disney Feature Animation. I had completed a 3 month training internship, and was hired on to this film to work with Supervising Animator, Brian Ferguson, on the character “Panic”. He was the one who gave me my break, and taught me so much. His love for animation was infectious and I felt so lucky to be mentored by someone with such talent.  Next would be the movie “Tarzan” also at Disney. On this film I mentored with Supervising Animator John Ripa on the character “Young Tarzan”. I had seen an animation test John had done and just knew I had to work with him. I went to his office and asked if I could assist him, and he told me yes, but under one condition… when a student of animation, or anyone seeing knowledge asked for help, that I would pass on what he had taught me. He said James Baxter had made him give that same promise and he had tried to keep it. I learned so much from John and will be forever grateful for the teaching, the time and the kindness he gave me. He was completely generous with his knowledge, and never let an opportunity for teaching pass by. This made working on the film so exhilarating for me. I will never forget it. And yes, I have tried to keep my promise.  Later I would move into television and was honored to be a part of Fred Seibert’s shorts program at Nickelodeon, “Random Cartoons”. I created two shorts..the first was “Yaki and Yumi” and the second was “Girls on the GO!”. It was an incredible experience making my own films. This is where I believe I went from being a draughtsman to a filmmaker. I completely fell in love with telling stories and the whole process of making a film. I also discovered a love for television type storytelling, and cartooning rather than animating.  And of course the show I am currently on, Phineas and Ferb. I am writing and storyboarding on the show and am also an Emmy nominated song writer too(still shocked about that)! I am really proud of the work that we are all doing on the show. I have really grown as a storyteller from watching my peers and working with some insanely talented people. I laugh every day at my job! I am surrounded by some of the funniest people I have ever met and I love the challenge of keeping up! It’s never a dull moment, and I think the fun we have with each other has a big impact on the way the show is turning out. It is fun to be on a show that is loved by so many people and I am honored to be a part of it.

How did you become interested in animation?  
My grandfather loved cartoons and drawing. He would sit down with me and draw. He always encouraged me and would patiently sit by my side and teach me little things he knew. But I feel like I was Continue…

Tom Ruegger

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

What is your name and your current occupation?
Name:  Tom Ruegger.   Current occupation:  various animation jobs.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I ran the film society at my school.  I worked for Twyman Films, a company that rented movies to colleges.  And I worked for my brother Jim Ruegger at Hillside Construction Company where I painted houses — interiors and exteriors — and did roofing.   After I fell off the roof a couple of times —  my mind was busy with cartoon scenarios —  my constructions career came to an end.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I’m proud of most of the shows I’ve worked on, especially “Animaniacs,”  “Tiny Toons,” “Pinky and the Brain,” “Histeria,” “Freakazoid,” “Road Rovers,” “A Pup Named Scooby Doo,” and individual episodes of lots of other shows.

How did you become interested in animation?
I loved cartoons ever since I saw them for the first time.  As a little kid, I drew my versions of the cartoon characters I saw on TV —  Yogi, Fred, Popeye, Bugs, Daffy, Porky, Mickey, Donald — – and my interest in Continue…

Tom Sito

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Tom Sito and I am an animator, storyboard artist and animation historian. My screen credits include Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Beauty and the Beast, Shrek, and Osmosis Jones. I am the author of four books on animation. Currently I am a Professor of Animation at the cinema school of the University of Southern California.

 

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I am from Brooklyn New York, the son of a fireman. As a child I always liked to draw cartoons and at first I thought I’d want to make comic strips. Then I attended the High School of Art & Design in Manhattan where I was shown how to make my characters move. I fell in love and Continue…

Ray Chase

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Ray Chase and I am a directing animator on “Free Birds” our first feature film at ReelFx. I am also a mentor at Animation Mentor.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I don’t know that I really had any crazy jobs.  But let’s say that I was a llama herder in Australia.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
A couple years ago I worked on a series of Looney Tunes cartoons which were a lot of fun.  One short in particular, “Daffy’s Rhapsody”, used original Mel Blanc recordings of Daffy Duck. It was pretty amazing to animate to his voice.

How did you become interested in animation?
I was always interested in animation as a kid but never thought much about doing it as a career.  Toward the end of high school Who framed Roger Rabbit came out and I was inspired; I saw it eight times in the theater.  A couple years later the Disney/MGM studios opened in Orlando where you could see real animators bringing characters to life.  That’s when I decided what I wanted to be when I grew up.

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I grew up in Gambrills Maryland. And went to school at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). They didn’t have much of an animation program at the time; this was the early 90s. After college I started applying to Disney to get a job as a 2d animator, but Continue…

Ted Wilson

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Ted Wilson and I am the co-creator and co-writer of the internet cartoon Gundarr. My partner Corey McDaniel and I also do the voice acting and music. Up until Season 3 (which starts airing on Mondomedia’s Youtube channel on July 17. Plugs ahoy!) we did all the animation as well.

 

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
From door to door sales to working in a lumber mill in Northern Ontario I have run the gamut of day jobs. I’ve also worked as a cook, picked rocks on oilfield reclamation sites and did a couple weeks of telemarketing when I was really up against the wall! None of them were very stimulating, but all those crappy jobs pushed me towards doing what I really love for a living: Animation!

 

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
The project I’m most proud of would have to be my current project, Gundarr. It started as something my friends and I did for fun one night, and somehow turned into a fulltime gig! My time as prop designer on My Little Pony was also a lot of fun. While the show itself isn’t what I would normally watch on my own, the team I worked with was super talented and funny, so I enjoyed myself everyday.

How did you become interested in animation?
I always loved cartoons growing up. My first love was probably comic books and newspaper strips, but I used to watch everything on Saturday morning, from the Smurfs to the old Looney Tunes to the Gummi Bears. The thing that really captured my imagination had to be when Continue…