Behind the Scenes: Kyle T. Webster on how he digitally recreated the Munch brushes

In a followup to the other day’s post, Adobe had a conversation with Kyle T. Webster on how exactly he recreated the Munch brushes.


In a world-first collaboration, which we call The Hidden Treasures of Creativity, Adobe is working with the support of The Munch Museum in Oslo and award winning Photoshop brush maker Kyle T. Webster to digitally recreate seven of the more than 100-year old brushes used by Edvard Munch, painter of the famous artwork ‘The Scream’, in order to make them available in Creative Cloud for Photoshop and Sketch users worldwide.

To give you a glimpse behind the scenes, we spoke with Kyle about his involvement in the project and how he was able to capture the exact detail of Munch’s brushes and recreate them in Photoshop and Sketch.

Click here to read the entire article.

Paint like a master: Adobe brings to life the 100-year old brushes of Edvard Munch

Adobe has just released a set of digital brushes on their blog created by Kyle T. Webster and based on the tools of Edvard Munch painter of The Scream.

From the article:

The unsung heroes of these famous paintings are the tools which created them. Many museums keep the brushes used to create such masterpieces out of sight, and in many cases, some artwork is also hidden away to avoid light or UV damage. To increase the accessibility of these classic pieces, prestigious museums like The Met in New York and in The Rijksmuseum Amsterdam have started to release their collections online.

To celebrate digital preservation of masterpieces, we at Adobe have teamed up with The Munch Museum in Oslo and award winning Photoshop brush maker Kyle T. Webster to recreate digital versions of the more than 100-year-old original brushes used by Edvard Munch, painter of the famous artwork ‘The Scream’, in order to make them available in Creative Cloud for Photoshop and Sketch users worldwide.

You can read the full article on Adobe’s blog and you can download the brushes themselves here.

Proofs of Concept from Exit 73 Studios

Cool little bit of animation from my friends over at Exit 73 Studios

The First one is called #BLUD:
It follows the adventures of Becky Belmont, who has to balance the perils of middle school by day and fighting the undead at night.  All of which serves as an allegory for what it’s like growing up as kid in this modern world.

The last one is called Duke and Darryl:
Darryl and his imaginary friend duke find ways to make mountains out of molehills in this Cartoony adventure!

Established Studio Embraces Real-Time Animation

The Adobe blogs have an interesting story on Renegade Animation and my old bosses who are using a new Adobe application called Character Animator.

Renegade Animation started out 25 years ago as a boutique commercial house specializing in 2D animation. Its two founders, Ashley Postlewaite and Darrell Van Citters met while working at Warner Bros. in the Looney Tunes commercial unit. Renegade Animation was an early adopter of digital tools to reduce costs and improve efficiency, and that still holds true today. Using many of the apps in Adobe Creative Cloud, the company created a paperless animation pipeline to support the production of animated episodic television, feature films, interactive games, and web and mobile content.

Recently Co-founder and Executive Producer Postlewaite, along with Production Manager Scott Lowe, and Animator and Storyboard Artist Scott Klass tried out another new technology. The team accepted an offer from Adobe to create some demo assets for Adobe Character Animator, a real-time animation tool that transforms static artwork into dynamic puppets.

Read the entire interview HERE.