Leo Oliveto

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What is your name and your current occupation?
I am a freelance CG artist. I am also on the crew for the upcoming animated shorts “Hullabaloo”.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
One time I was a security guard in a middle school. There had been great tension between two large groups in the school that culminated in a pretty large standoff. Imagine two crowds of about 250 people each about ten feet from each other ready to go to war. It looked like a scene out of Braveheart or something.  The only thing between them for about thirty seconds was me. Luckily they didn’t charge. I have also been a dish washer ,gardener, and a lot of other things.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Certainly the project I have been most proud to be a part of is Hullabaloo. I have been lucky enough to know the creator, James Lopez, for several years now and have watch  it grow from sketches on the wall to a full on successful indigogo campaign. I have loved the Disney style of animation since I was a child so to be invited to be part of that team is a privilege and an honor. It’s not everyday you get to work with animation greats.

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
Well I was born in Buenos Aires Argentina but moved to Los Angeles when I was seven years old.  I guess you could say I’m just starting out in the animation business with Hullabaloo as it is going to be the first animation project I will be a part of.  Up to this point I have only worked on tv shows, games, and toys. How I got to this point is what I’m guessing aspiring artist would want to know. Most people would say hard work,determination, and luck. Although that last statement is true it doesn’t say much so I will tell my story. I took a job as a souvenir photo booth attendant at a special even at the Walt Disney Studio.  The only reason I took the job was to get through the gates, which to me always felt like the hardest step in the process. In the soundstage we were set up across from where some Disney animators were giving drawing lessons to attendees. I was determined to speak to one of the animators and show them my work. Once I mustered up the courage I walked up and introduced myself to to to man behind the desk. The crowd had cleared but he was still doodling on the page (this is where the luck part comes in). The man behind the desk was James Lopez. Well to make a long story short he became my mentor and over a period of a couple of years he helped me improve my drawing skills dramatically. Around this time I also decided I would go back to school to learn the CG workflow for animated films. I enrolled at Gnomon School of Visual Effects. As one of my projects I decided to model the car from Jame’s personal animated project (Hullabaloo). It was, I think, at that point when he decided to let me help him with his project. Fast forward about a year and a half and here we are. So needles to say it does take time, hard work, determination, and luck.

What’s a typical day like for you with regards to your job?
Well my day usually consist of exercise in the morning. Then I get right to work. As I do freelance as a cg artist the jobs can always range from modeling, sculpting, texturing, and sometime design. I might be working at home in which case I crank up the tunes and work all day till my wife gets home. Or I might be working in an office. A work day can range from 1 hour to 18 hours long. If I have time I like to work on personal projects in the evening and on the weekends. Also I’m constantly looking for new techniques on how to create cool stuff. During my free time recently I have been working mostly on Hullabaloo.
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Travis Overstreet

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What is your name and your current occupation? 
I’m Travis Overstreet and I’m the lead designer and animator at Crawford Media in Atlanta, Georgia.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation? 
For the most part I waited tables to put myself through school but there were a couple of interesting odd jobs sprinkled in. The most interesting one would have to be the steel fabrication shop I worked in for a summer. I was raised in the south but I never really picked up the culture so I stuck out like a sore thumb. We had to be there every morning at 4:30am and being the smart person I am I went to see the midnight release of Star Wars 3. Needless to say I didn’t get any sleep that night and during my shift the next day I dozed off while using a machine and fractured a piece of metal sending a small fragment into my forearm. Even though I hated the hours I couldn’t have asked for a better group of people to work with.

How did you become interested in animation? 
Cartoons were the best things on television. Cartoon network didn’t come along until I was in middle school so cartoons were a precious commodity. If I wasn’t watching them I was Continue…

“Fric Frac” by Oscar Malet

Animation student Oscar Malet’s 3rd year animation film made in 2 months at MOPA (formerly Supinfocom Arles). malet.oscar(at)gmail.com

Wow! What a great little film. It has ambience, mood, some really nice slapstick and a pleasing character design. And I can NOT get over the rendering of that Bug! AmaZing to see the quality that the animation schools are turning out these days.

A thief goes into a garage to steal a car, but things don’t turn out as expected… Made with 3dsmax/VRay/Zbrush/Marvelous/Substance Painter/After Effects/Premiere Pro/Audition

Shaun Bryant

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Shaun Bryant and I am a character designer currently doing freelance work in Austin TX.

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
I had a gig as a sign holding Santa for a florist in upstate NY. Thankfully they had a warm greenhouse I could thaw out in.
What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
There have been a lot of fun projects, but the one that I think I am most proud of so far is creating a cast of fun characters for the Texas Dept. of Agriculture. They were used in television and print ads promoting healthy eating among school children.
How did you become interested in animation?
Comic books, Saturday morning cartoons, and Disney movies fueled my creativity as a kid and made me Continue…

Brent J. Zorich

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Brent J. Zorich and I am the Chief Technology Officer of BRENT ZORICH PRODUCTIONS, LLC.What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
One summer during industrial design school in the 90s at Ohio State I worked as a bouncer at a dueling piano bar named Howl at The Moon. I didn’t realize it when I took the summer gig, but occasionally throughout the night the staff had to get on stage and dance to songs from Grease… ah, the memories.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I played MADDEN growing up so getting to be a lead rigger on that was pretty rewarding. Seeing my name in Star Wars credits was really rewarding also. I loved sitting in dailies critiquing shots on TRANSFORMERS REVENGE OF THE FALLEN. My favorite intellectual property is actually HARRY POTTER; at Lucasfilm Animation Singapore I was in charge of arranging sequences for monthlies in addition to my regular tasks. The monthlies that I arranged were for HARRY POTTER AND THE HALF BLOOD PRINCE and I got to work with the raw footage of Daniel Radcliff and see the before and after… really fun. The music I used in the backdrop when I showed to sequence to the all staff was Eulogy by Tool. I remember being at Lucasfilm in San Francisco and opening up a script for Indiana Jones written by Steven Spielberg and realizing I made it! I loved going through executive training at Lucasfilm, it was a weeklong through the executive trainer, Larry Seal, and I was being prepped to run a studio. I also enjoyed being on the Lucasfilm Best Practices Steering Committee that set the direction for all digital assets in regards to Lucasfilm Animation, LucasArts, and Industrial Light and Magic. There were about ten of us on the committee.  But, I’d have to say the most rewarding experience was in Lucasfilm Animation Singapore and my film game convergence group that I was in took the television version of Ahsoka Tanu, Anakin Skywalker’s Padawan, and I modified it so it would work in the Unreal Engine. We showed it directly to George Lucas when he came to see the studio in summer of 2008 and he couldn’t tell the difference between my Ahsoka rendering on the XBOX 360 and the version used on television.

How did you become interested in animation?
Three years old in summer of 1977, “A long time ago in a galaxy, far, far, away….” You’ll figure it out.

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I am from Columbus, Ohio and I got into the animation business by Continue…

Oliver Simonsen

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Oliver Simonsen, President of What Comics Entertainment -currently in co-production with “Pink Slip Animation” Directing “Cerebus the aardvark -tale of a fractured destiny“, based on the Graphic Novel that started the independent comic book market.
and in pre-production: “Bug Juice” based on the hit indie Graphic Novel series “Bug House”.  The idea is we’ll focus on productions based on independent/alternative comics. A Miramax of cartoons, if you will:)
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Trying really hard to erase those from my memory lol.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
“The Hooligans” -a sorta adult swim type show…basically i learned computer graphics and computers in general while working on it, something i had barely touched upon till that point.


It was during the dotcom boom and the sky was the limit: heady days and a lot of fun and learned so much. The final outcome wasn’t maybe the best -but it was a great learning experience.

How did you become interested in animation?
Anybody who knew me as a kid knew that animation, comicbooks and film was the only thing i ever wanted to do. Not sure why. I’ve asked myself that same thing many times:)  One thing was moving to Norway when 9 and they really didn’t have much in the way of cartoons on TV overthere at the time, this was mid to late 70s. This in turn Continue…