Jorden Oliwa

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Jorden Oliwa Aka Johnny Gonzo, Freelance animator/Illustrator/comic artist.

 

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Building scaffolds in the ashtrays of coal power plants. Managing a kitchen, cooking fulltime.

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
Massive Swerve/ Ren and Stimpy APC/ Mucha Lucha/ Motorcity/ Roy/ Angry Beavers/ Mission Hill.

 

How did you become interested in animation?
I was into comic books first and a teacher recommended that Continue…

Kali Fontecchio

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Kali Fontecchio and I currently work at Walt Disney Animation as a designer.
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Well nothing too crazy, my first job out of high school was actually as an art director on a cellphone massive multiplayer game. It was before anyone was doing that in the US so it didn’t really take off.
What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
My favorite projects have been here at Disney, but I’m not allowed to discuss them. Of the ones I can mention, probably The Looney Tunes Show, Yo! Gabba Gabba, Rick and Morty and various John K. projects. I’m proud of every opportunity I get, but whatever the most current project I’m on becomes my favorite.
How did you become interested in animation?
Watching Mickey Mouse and Bugs Bunny growing up inspired my love of cartoons, also Continue…

Sarah Harkey

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What is your name and your current occupation?
Sarah Harkey– Freelance Artist and Assistant Animator at John K Enterprises.
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Not very much crazy… I worked as an usher at the Chicago Theater, a sales associate at Toys R Us, a Nanny for two awesome kids… all in all I tried to pick things that would still let me do art or be connected with art in some way… though some of those were stretching it!
What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I’ve really enjoyed working with John Kricfalusi. The longest gig so far was working as an assistant animator on “The Simpson’s” couch gag that preceded “Bart Stops to Smell the Roosevelts”, there was lots of inbetweeing, clean up, ink and paint, and texture painting… there was also lots of eating lunch on TV trays while watching Terry Toons, haha
How did you become interested in animation?
I’ve always really loved animation. As a kid, if it wasn’t animated it was really hard for me to be interested (thats still sort of true today… yikes). Being a little girl in the early 90s I was of course obsessed with all things Disney princess. I also had lots of compilation VHS tapes of early Felix the Cat episodes, Popeye, Bugs Bunny, Rankin/Bass specials, strange fairy tale knock offs… if it was in a bargain bin at Wal-Mart in the 80s I probably ended up with it in the 90s. I always enjoyed drawing and art, but it wasn’t until senior year of high school that I Continue…

Corey M. Barnes

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Corey M. Barnes, and I’m a storyboard artist. I just wrapped up my gig as storyboard supervisor on China, IL at Titmouse, Inc., and am currently storyboarding season 3 of Superjail!

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
When I was a teen I worked at JC Penney. I was one of the guys who folded clothes that people threw on the floor or just didn’t put back properly. I remember I found two children, one being a baby, hiding under a rack of clothes with no parents around. I thought they were lost or forgotten. Two minutes later the dad comes running up to me and starts accusing me of thinking because the kids were black that they were stealing stuff, all the while his wife is trying to calm him down. Continue…

Colter Avara

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What is your name and your current occupation?
My name is Colter Avara. I am currently a freelance illustrator, animator and designer. Most of my clients are mobile game and app developers!

 

What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation?
Oh man, I think I am pretty fortunate on that front. I spent several years working various IT jobs, unfortunately that isn’t crazy. Just boring. The craziest job I ever had was given to me by my dad. When I was a kid, I really wanted a video game. I think it was Sonic The Hedgehog 2 but I’m not 100% sure, I wanted pretty much every game.  In an attempt to teach me about working for things in life, he told me that he would buy the game for me if I plucked every clover flower in our yard. Our yard was over an acre and full of mostly clover, just to give you an idea of what I was dealing with. It was crazy! I spent almost an entire week filling up drywall buckets with flowers. I don’t think either of my parents predicted that I would be so diligent, but the buckets of clover flowers and the swarm of pissed off honey bees told them otherwise. They had me stop at around 4-5 buckets.  I earned the video game and possibly destroyed an ecosystem in the process. Sorry, to any honey bees out there. I’m probably going to get trolled by honey bees now.

 

What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of?
I enjoyed working on all of my projects, but I had the most fun on the projects where I had a little more creative freedom, particularly on a social game that I worked on called, Rock Riot. It was a guitar hero style facebook game. The team really let me take the reigns creatively and the player community was really into it! That was the best part, seeing the players enjoy the items I had created. I’ll never forget the first time I saw players using the turkey guitar I made for Thanksgiving. That was hilarious.

 

Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business?
I am originally from Maryland and I am now living in Pennsylvania. My professional career started in 2008 when I worked with John Kricfalusi on The George Liquor Program. After that, Continue…

Sierra Lewis

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What is your name and your current occupation? 
My name is Sierra Lewis and I am currently an Art Director at Renegade Animation.
What are some of the crazier jobs you had before getting into animation? 
 When I graduated from LCAD in 2009 it was right in the middle of the recession. The area where my family and I lived actually had a higher rate of unemployment than Los Angeles at that time. I couldn’t even get a job as a barista at a local coffee house unless I had one years experience working at Starbucks. In short, it was nearly impossible to secure even part time income.
I ended up having to look out of state for work. I have some considerable experience working with horses and doing various barn chores so I packed up my belongings and moved to Arizona working as a Wrangler on a dude ranch. This was a sprawling working cattle ranch that consisted of nearly 150 horses and around 200 head of Texas Longhorn cattle in the beautiful Sonoran desert.
I had a fantastic and unique opportunity to teach folks from all over the world how to ride horses and guided them through thousands of acres of surprisingly lush desert. I groomed, saddled, doctored and fed these horses while doing all my other chores and activities with guests six days a week, fourteen hours a day (in 111 degree heat). It was very hard work but even harder on the horses. After watching a third horse during the exceedingly harsh summer season die in agony from either a careless accident or (most likely heat or dehydration induced) colic, I quit and headed back to California.
What are some of your favorite projects you’re proud to have been a part of? 
My favorite project so far has got to be “Attack of the 50 Foot Hero” that I completed last summer (2012) under the mentorship of Eric Goldberg. From concept to completion we had 12 weeks to complete a three minute film. I got to collaborate with some very talented friends and colleagues. It was a great experience to have Mr. Goldberg as our mentor. He taught us some very good production management skills, but more importantly helped us to narrow our focus and become stronger storytellers in all facets of the film making process.
Where are you from and how did you get into the animation business? 
I’m originally from a little area in Los Angeles called Woodland Hills. I’ve lived in L.A. County for the majority of my life. I believe I got into the animation business first via working on Facebook Social Games. Through that job I was given Continue…